Top 10 Shoes to prevent Plantar Fasciitis

ANSWER: There aren’t any.plantar never again

Plantar Fasciitis is caused by not opening and closing your foot when you walk. Before your heel hits the ground you should open your foot, like opening your hand before you catch a ball, and then grip the ground with your foot. In a walking stride, when your foot is directly below you is when you are gripping the ground.

A lack of not opening and closing your foot is precisely how plantar fasciitis is caused.

If you have had a hip, knee, or foot injury. It is likely you have also lost the range of motion in your ankle and the flexibility in your plantar muscles. This lack of movement is caused because the body is protecting the injury. One is not able to put your full weight on the injury so you will hobble along on the other healthy leg to not disturb the injured leg. So your foot and ankle will lock up to protect the injury. I have seen this a lot with sport related injuries and lingering chronic injuries with professional athletes, they may get the rehab, but…

…After the injury has healed, you may be still be walking injured. One has to know where your injury is and once the inflammation and pain has gone away then you need to flex the injury. One can be injured and may take weeks or months to recover. In that time you may have formed a habit to not walk on the injured leg. In this time your plantar muscles have hardened. If you had an injury on one leg, it is likely your weight has shifted to the side of that injured leg. This will lead to low back pain on the same side as that leg, nerve pain that runs down the outside part of the leg, knee pain, or pain on the outside of the ankle.

For rehabilitation of the plantar fasciitis and rehabilitation for an injury it is imperative to open and close the plantar muscles and stretch and flex the full range of motion of the ankle. You can’t have a loose and limber hip, knee, or low back if your ankle and plantar muscles are tight. If you foot is tight your hip will be equally tight.

When I go around the web and see the top ten lists of best shoes for plantar fasciitis I just see shoe sales. They are trying to make shoes for better heel striking. If you check my book “How to Walk Correctly” I believe I make a great case that most foot and leg injuries are due to a poor walking stride techniques. I can explain that every injury is posture related and a walking technique related. By using my walking technique I have solved all these issues myself. I have had plantar fasciitis, low back pain, shin splints, knee, and hip pain. When you apply my walking technique you will get an instant relief, however, it is breaking a habit but after a few years I have solved them all. Which makes me beyond confident to be telling you if you want to be pain-free my technique when applied can help you. There is no secret to the technique because if you look down you can figure it out. I am merely linking things like not flexing your right big toe may cause neck pain on your left side. So flexing your toe may resolve your neck pain. Many practitioners do not link this together as the distance is to too far apart to be related. But if you have a house with a crooked window because the foundation has sunk….what would be the best fix?

When running you are supposed to be not hitting your heel anyways. The running stride is actually shorter than the walking stride. When walking, your stride, when measured should be longer than your running stride. When running you should be on the top 3/4 of your foot. [Video Heel Strike] Hitting your heel slows you down and jams your hip.

Check my free download of “How to Walk Correctly” and I will also send you videos on what incorrect and correct walking strides look like. Exercises of videos of how plantar fasiciits is caused and how to do exercises to prevent and rehabilitate injuries.  [Answer Revealed in the Free Download here].

The best shoes that help with plantar fasciitis relief, however got to learn my technique first. A shoe alone will not help you. Technique comes first.

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